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Lighthouses on the Hudson

The Hudson River has many lighthouses that are scattered throughout its length wherever ships and barges go. Some of these lighthouses have become famous to the public after years of service.

One would never expect to find lighthouses on the Hudson River, but the Hudson is navigable to the Port of Albany in his title as far north as the federal ban in Troy. Yes, there are many lighthouses along the Hudson River. The first of these lighthouses is a little red lighthouse that is in the shadows of the George Washington Bridge. This lighthouse was made famous in a children's book titled, “the Little Red Lighthouse under the Big Gray Bridge.” This is the first lighthouse in a chain of seven that are along the Hudson River all the way up to Albany. The Statue of Liberty is also a lighthouse but is located in New York Harbor not the Hudson River even though the Hudson flows through the harbor.

When he sailed up the river that bears his name little bit Henry Hudson ever expect that it would someday be a highway to the center of the content rather than the Northwest passage to the Orient. The Hudson River almost 300 years later became the trade route to the Midwest via the Erie Canal, and river towns sprung up along the river to transport their goods both to New York City and upstate New York. The ships and barges had to be guided past the many dangerous places in the river. The earliest attempts at this were with post lights, but because the system was not organized it proved to be ineffective. The post light was simply a lantern hanging on a post that was full of all sorts of calamities that could blow the candle out during the night.

When the Erie Canal opened in 1820 5B not a commercial traffic on the Hudson River greatly increased the US lighthouse establishment felt the need for a more sophisticated system of lights. The first of these new lights was established in 1826 with the opening of the Stony Point Lighthouse. This was only the first of many that when it was completed included 14 lighthouses and numerous post lamps that guided her readers on the Hudson River to safety.

As mentioned previously, the Little Red Lighthouse, also known as Jeffrey's Hook first opened in 1921, but was the deactivated in 1947 by the Coast Guard because the well lit George Washington Bridge made it unnecessary. Each September the Little red lighthouse Festival draws thousands of visitors to its site just under the bridge. During the warmer months of the year there are regular tours of the lighthouse that are conducted by the urban Park Rangers.

The lighthouse at Sleepy Hollow was built in 1883 it became obsolete when they built the Tappan Zee Bridge between Tarrytown and Nyack. This was one of the so-called sparkplug lighthouses that eventually became a museum under the Westchester County Parks recreation and conservation. This lighthouse was the activated in 1961.

The oldest lighthouse on the Hudson River is the stony point lighthouse that was built in 1826 and was completely restored in 1995. This lighthouse is located on the stony point Battlefield historic State site. The view from this lighthouse’s lantern room shows a majestic sweep of the Highlands and Haverstraw Bay. This lighthouse can be visited daily and gives visitors a chance to see a beautifully restored fourth order Fresnall lens that used to guide the river traffic.

Known too many as the Maid of the Meadow the Esopus Lighthouse is the last of the wooden lighthouses on the Hudson River. Only a few years else this lighthouse was in danger of tumbling into the river, but it has been fully restored by the dedicated efforts of the Esopus Lighthouse Commission.

The Rondout Lighthouse is located on the north bank of Rondout Creek in Kingston. This lighthouse was built in the 1915. Regular tours of this lighthouse are conducted during the season that has been popularized by the popular tales of the haunted lighthouse and other stories on the Hudson River. This is still an active aid to navigation, but also offers its visitors a look back in time when there were bustling with old passenger steamers, tugs and barges carrying people and goods along the Hudson River.

Another old light of the Hudson River is located in Saugerties New York where the lighthouse Conservancy that was formed in 1985 is charged with the duty of saving and restoring this it story polite back to active duty. The lighthouse was the activated in 1954, but was relit in 1990. This is one of the few lighthouses are visitor can learn what the duties of the light keeper were by spending the night at the lighthouse as a in-resident light keeper. This lighthouse is equipped with a deck that allows the visitor to have spectacular views of both the river and the Catskill Mountains to the West. There is a floating dock next to the lighthouse where you can moor your boat.

The last lighthouse in this series is called the Hudson-Athens lighthouse is a beautiful brick lighthouse citizen dating post to safety around the middle ground flat since 1874. Due to restoration efforts inside the lighthouse is been completely restored to an active aid to navigation on the Hudson River. The restoration efforts undertaken by the Hudson- Athens Preservation Lighthouse Society has restored this to a true maritime treasure of the river. For now the lighthouses is closed to the public and can only be visited during the season by taking advantage of guided tours.

More information about lighthouses on the Hudson River can be had at: http://hudsonlights.com/

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Comments (2)
Ranked #96 in History

Lighthouses are such a fascinating area of history, culture, and architecture.

Truly, very lovely!,

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