Top 10 Most Important Historical Facts About Delhi, India
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Top 10 Most Important Historical Facts About Delhi, India

The history of Delhi dates back to 1450 BC since its mention in the famous ancient Hindu epic Mahabharata. Delhi was called Hastinapur in Sanskrit and the origin of the name "Delhi" is not clear. The Delhi Sultanate was established  by Afghan warrior Muhammad of Ghori and lasted until 1526. Delhi is the centre of Mughal architecture. The Red Fort, built in almost 20 years (1639-1648), by the Mughal monarch Shahjahan, had a great significance in historical Delhi. India Gate commemorates the Indian soldiers who died in the Afghan Wars and World War 1. Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated in Delhi. Delhi has been the capital of 7 empires. The Bahá’í House of Worship in Delhi has drawn more than 70 million visitors.
  1. The first available history of Delhi dates back to 1450 BC, with the Indraprastha settlement located on the site of Delhi, that finds its mention in the famous ancient Hindu epic Mahabharata.

     

  2. Hindu texts state that Delhi was called Hastinapur in Sanskrit as Hastinapur, which means "elephant-city". The origin of the name "Delhi" is not clear. It is commonly said that its eponym is Dhillu or Dilu, a king of the Mauryan dynasty, who built the city in 50BC and named it after himself. In Pakrit ''dhili'' ("loose") was used to refer to the city because a a landmark iron pillar built by Raja Dhava had a weak foundation and was replaced. Coins in circulation at that time were called dehliwal. The name could be derived from Dilli, a corruption of dehleez or dehali—both terms meaning 'threshold' or 'gateway'— and symbolic of the city as a gateway to the plain starting from the city theory suggests that the city's original name was Dhillika. It is also said the King of Indraprastha built a new fort for convenience of all four castes in the region. He ordered a gateway to that fort and later named the fort dehali. It later became Dilli. Delhi is referenced in various idioms in Indo-Aryan languages.

     

  3. In 1206AD the Delhi Sultanate was established  by Afghan warrior Muhammad of Ghori and his legions. The Sutanate lasted until 1526, surviving Timur's deadly assault in 1396, in which the city was totally destroyed in what was to be the first of many of the destructions and rebuilding of Delhi. This first reconstruction of the city helped initially establish Delhi as the Islamic capital of India, as well as being the catalyst for of cultural changes in the subcontinent. With the new religion, Islam, came considerable changes in literature, art and architecture.

     

  4. Delhi is the centre of Mughal architecture and the city abounds with Mughal architecture and influences in the design of temples and tombs. The tomb of 13th Century Amir Khusrau, known as father of Hindi sufi music and father of Urdu language, a blend of Arabic, Persian and Indian languages, gives rise to a very popular yearly music and poetry festival, while Humayun's tomb, said to rival the Taj Mahal itself, was built in 1565 by Hamida Banu Begum, Humayun's widow

     

  5. The Red Fort, built in almost 20 years (1639-1648), by the Mughal monarch Shahjahan, had a great significance in historical Delhi, and became the residence of the emperor and his royal family, and of subsequent rulers. Though it was looted of beautiful treasures like the famous Peacock throne of Shahajahan (by Nadir Shah when he looted Delhi in 1739) the fort is well-maintained, with all its original Persian, European and Indian artwork intact, and stands testimony of Indian art and culture. 

     

  6. When Jama Masjid, was completed by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan, in 1658 it became the largest mosque in India, and still is. It has three gateways, four angle towers and two 40m high minarets in red sandstone and marble and is located on the other side of road to the Red Fort.

     

  7. The symbolic and iconic red sandstone India Gate in Delhi commemorates the 90,000 Indian soldiers who died in the Afghan Wars and World War 1.

     

  8. Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated in Delhi, at Birla House on January 30,1948. A three foot tall stone memorial has been erected at the site. Scenes from Gandhi's life have been painted on the walls and red sandstone ceilings. 

     

  9. Delhi has been the capital of 7 empires - Mamluks (1206–90), Khilji(1290–1320), Tughlaqs (1320–1413), Sayyids (1414–51), Lodis (1 years.451–1526), Mughals (1526–1857), British (1857–1947) and in 2011 celebrated being the capital of India for 100 years.

     

  10. Since its inauguration to public worship and visits in December 1986, the Bahá’í House of Worship in Delhi has drawn more than 70 million visitors, making it one of the most visited edifices in the world.

 

 

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